A Light in the Attic

Morgan Ashleigh. 22. INFJ. Philadelphia area. Illustration major. Intersectional Feminist. Black and Cherokee. Open-minded.

I post about things I like, including but not limited to art, music, cooking, human rights, science and history. I would be more than happy to be your friend.

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return"
Recent Tweets @Smorgasborddd

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Information about VonDerrit’s murder from the man behind Darren Wilson’s fundraiser, who was himself fired for filing false information as a police officer? Let’s be vigilant. 

Part Three

Part One

Part Two

Tuesday, October 14th

iwriteaboutfeminism:

The police union held a press conference today to release information about the killing of VonDerrit Myers, whom they described as “no angel.”

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Tuesday, October 14th

(via dopesickles)

popnegro:

THIS IS HAPPENING RIGHT NOW IN MEXICO

25 students where hurt and 43 disappeared in México because they were protesting on the streets. It is well known that the police was involved on the disappearances !!!!!!

Police isn’t killing people just in Ferguson, its also happening in Iguala, Guerrero, México! HELP US SO EVERYBODY KNOWS HOW THE FUCKING GOVERNMENT IS CORRUPT AND THE MOTHER FUCKING PRESIDENT ISN’T DOING SHIT AT ALL!!!! PAULINA PENA, THE PRESIDENT’S DAUGHTER, IS ON VACATION IN EUROPE USING ALL OF OUR FUCKING MONEY WHILE THIS IS HAPPENING IN OUR COUNTRY!!!!!

(via jugo-de-tomate)

ethiopienne:

shoutout to all the sensitive black girls

(via hydratedandmelanated)

angrywocunited:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

angrywocunited:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

escapedgoat:

fagbarbie:

steal her style: Ina Garten

denim shirt: woven from Egyptian grown cotton and died with the  wildest indigo grown in South Carolina 

pearl earrings: gathered from the bottom of the Persian Gulf

tomatoes: picked fresh from the finest gardens in Italy during the winter’s harvest

but if you can’t store bought is fine

X__X

(via hydratedandmelanated)

gradientlair:

Blue at the Louvre.

She’s so precious!

flyartproductions:

Luncheon of the Super Rich Kids

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Luncheon of the Boating Party (1881) / Super Rich Kids, Frank Ocean

cartoonpolitics:

Racism in Italy -  Cécile Kyenge, Italy’s first black minister and target of increasing racial slurs, had bananas thrown at her while making a speech .. the lady responded coolly that it was ‘a waste of food’..  (more here)

(via ethiopienne)

dynastylnoire:

undefinednation:

Boost this, please!!! I don’t know Shayla but she was in my homeroom- I saw her almost every day. I just found out about her missing status and I’m shocked. Spread the word in any way you can, especially people in Queens and within Delaware County in Pennsylvania!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

(via fuckyeahfamousblackgirls)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

A small group of protesters gather outside a Wal-Mart in Ferguson and the police react by shutting it down.

Monday, October 13th

(via reallycomfortablepillows)

onlyblackgirl:

Indigenous People’s Day Photo Project 2013

"Dear Columbus…"

Photo Credit: Andrew Burlingham

South Puget Sound Community College’s Diversity & Equity Center

Olympia, WA 

(via spokanesammirose)