A Light in the Attic

Morgan Ashleigh 21. Philadelphia area. Illustration major. Liberal. Black and Cherokee. Taken by a wonderful man. Open-minded. I post about things I like, including but not limited to art, music, cooking, human rights, nature, history and philosophy. I would be more than happy to be your friend.
"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return"
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Posts tagged "India"

fotojournalismus:

A man carries his child in a bag as he crosses a street in Bhubaneswar, India, on Aug. 9, 2013.

[Credit : Biswaranjan Rout/AP]

fotojournalismus:

A Hindu devotee, face smeared with coloured powder, leaves the Banke Bihari temple during Holi celebrations in Vrindavan, India on March 27, 2013.

[Credit : Altaf Qadri/AP]

mydesirelines:

it’s Holi | festival of color | India

Holi is also great time to capture the celebration of colors. Amazing shades captured through lens.

Happy Holi. NOT Happy Color Run, but Happy Holi

le-plus-beau-des-mensonges:

Torso of a fertility goddess (yakshi) from the Great Stupa at Sanchi, Sunga period, Sanchi, Stupa 1, Madhya Pradesh, Central India (sandstone), Indian School (25 BC-AD 25) / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

(via wine-loving-vagabond)

itsbeebee:

In solidarity with New Delhi’s “Brave heart.”

socialismartnature:

sign from India protest against sexual violence

womentravelmotherindia:

The Gulabi Gang is an extraordinary women’s movement formed in 2006 by Sampat Pal Devi in the Banda District of Uttar Pradesh in Northern India. This region is one of the poorest districts in the country and is marked by a deeply patriarchal culture, rigid caste divisions, female illiteracy, domestic violence, child labour, child marraiges and dowry demands. The women’s group is popularly known as Gulabi or ‘Pink’ Gang because the members wear bright pink saris and wield bamboo sticks. Sampat says, “We are not a gang in the usual sense of the term, we are a gang for justice.”

I saw a documentary on them. You go girls!

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

mohandasgandhi:

globalpost:

MUMBIA, India — On July 9, a group of men attacked a girl after she stepped out of a club on a busy street in Guwahati, Assam. A reporter, who was later joined by a cameraman, filmed the entire incident, and a local television channel released the footage the following day.

The girl was molested, burned, and beaten for at least half an hour. The men tried to strip off her clothes. The girl fruitlessly begged bystanders, passersby, and the men filming for help – nobody put a stop to it.

Read more at GlobalPost

We should all refuse to live in a world where the cries for help from a woman being sexually assaulted are ignored.

vivirdormiramar:

Mahabat Maqbara, Junagadh, Gujarat, India.

(via ayyweyy)

npr:

theeconomist:

The wedding of two frogs in Nagpur, India, arranged by farmers hoping for rain. A looming drought there is manageable, but long-term changes to the monsoon might be catastrophic.

She wears a cheerio on her left hand. 
—Daisy 

ethnoworld:

Chhadvara,Gujarat,India

ethnoworld:

Chhadvara,Gujarat,India

ethnoworld:


Meghwal tribal woman (Gujarat).
Jewellery.
The people of Meghwal tribe are originally from Marwar in Rajasthan. These days they are also found living in western Gujarat near the Pakistan border. In Pakistan, Meghwals mostly live in Tharparker, Badin, Mirpurkhas, and Umerkot districts while in Southern Punjab. Marwar is the region of Rajasthan in India that lies in Thar Desert.
They live in small hamlets of round, mud-brick huts painted on the outside with colourful geometric designs and decorated with detailed mirror inlays. The women are famous for their embroidery work and are master wool and cotton weavers. The men are woodcarvers and leather workers. Meghwals are considered as most peacefull among all the tribes living in Gujarat, Sindh, Rajasthan, Punjab.The Meghwal women are renowned for their exuberantly detailed costumes and jewellery. Married Meghwal women are often spotted wearing gold nose ring, earrings and neckpieces. They were given to the bride as a “bride wealth” dowry by her soon-to-be husband’s mother. The Meghwal women’s embroidery is avidly sought after. Their work is distinguished by their primary use of red, which comes from a local pigment produced from crushed insects. The Meghwal women artisans of Thar desert in Sindh and Balochistan, and in Gujarat are considered master of the traditional embroidery and Ralli making. Exotic hand embroidered items form part of dowry of Meghwal woman.The Meghwal tribe are known to be both Hindu and Muslim.

ethnoworld:

Meghwal tribal woman (Gujarat).

Jewellery.

The people of Meghwal tribe are originally from Marwar in Rajasthan. These days they are also found living in western Gujarat near the Pakistan border. In Pakistan, Meghwals mostly live in Tharparker, Badin, Mirpurkhas, and Umerkot districts while in Southern Punjab. Marwar is the region of Rajasthan in India that lies in Thar Desert.

They live in small hamlets of round, mud-brick huts painted on the outside with colourful geometric designs and decorated with detailed mirror inlays. The women are famous for their embroidery work and are master wool and cotton weavers. The men are woodcarvers and leather workers. Meghwals are considered as most peacefull among all the tribes living in Gujarat, Sindh, Rajasthan, Punjab.
The Meghwal women are renowned for their exuberantly detailed costumes and jewellery. Married Meghwal women are often spotted wearing gold nose ring, earrings and neckpieces. They were given to the bride as a “bride wealth” dowry by her soon-to-be husband’s mother.
The Meghwal women’s embroidery is avidly sought after. Their work is distinguished by their primary use of red, which comes from a local pigment produced from crushed insects. The Meghwal women artisans of Thar desert in Sindh and Balochistan, and in Gujarat are considered master of the traditional embroidery and Ralli making. Exotic hand embroidered items form part of dowry of Meghwal woman.
The Meghwal tribe are known to be both Hindu and Muslim.

omgthatartifact:

Bracelet

India, 1860-1870

The Walters Art Museum

Navratri festival,India

Navratri festival,India

ethnoworld:

Navratri festival,India