A Light in the Attic

Morgan Ashleigh 21. Philadelphia area. Illustration major. Liberal. Black and Cherokee. Taken by a wonderful man. Open-minded. I post about things I like, including but not limited to art, music, cooking, human rights, nature, history and philosophy. I would be more than happy to be your friend.
"The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return"
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Posts tagged "photography"

policymic:

This is what American Indians really look like

 ”Where’s your horse? Would you bless me? I’ve always wanted to be blessed by an Indian.”

These are the types of questions photographer Matika Wilbur, a member of the Swinomish and Tulalip tribes, has encountered when meeting non-Native people. Such experiences have largely prompted her latest endeavor, Project 562. Wilbur, whose name means “messenger,” wants to use her photography to deliver a powerful message about what it means to be Indian.

Read more | Follow policymic

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smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Snail Stretch

Photography by Chairunnas Chairunnas (Bontang, East Kalimantan, Indonesia); Bontang, East Kalimantan, Indonesia

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queennubian:

youngblackandvegan:

blackfashion:

Sisters in Harlem, NY.

Photographed by Jazmin Jones.
missjonesmedia.tumblr.com

aging beautifully

yessssssssss! go on mothers!

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youbestnotmiss:

megustamemes:

[qozop]

weirdly it all seems to suit everyone

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dressingcold:

Philadelphia, PA

2/9/14

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yagazieemezi:

First Australians

In Australian media, there is no shortage of coverage of the Aboriginal population. And, according to photographer Amy Toensing, the coverage is not always favorable."On paper, the truth is there’s some really hard stuff going on [within the Aboriginal population] — like with alcoholism and education," Toensing says over the phone from New York.

So when she convinced National Geographic in 2009 to invest in a long-term documentary about Aboriginal culture, Toensing decided to take a different approach:

"It’s about people and how they are still connected to the land," she says of her work. "The moment you start spending time in Aboriginal communities … you can tell there’s this really powerful connection to the Australian landscape."

Nearly four years after starting the project, Toensing’s work has culminated in National Geographic's June issue. The article takes a comprehensive look at life in Aboriginal communities today — and includes a few striking facts, like: “More than a half million Aboriginals currently live in Australia, less than three percent of the [original] population.”

Although stories like these often emphasize “a community in decline,” Toensing’s photos celebrate what has endured. And although the story has gone to print, for Toensing it’s to be continued. 

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catherinefaulkner:

It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.” - Henry David Thoreau

Self watering comfort eating plant pot.

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kiduseless:

THE REMAINING EXTRUSION OF A LONG DEAD TREE FROM OUT OF THE WATER (2014)